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singles/eps - february 2017


 

Grandaddy - "Ever More"

Grandaddy wrote one of my favourite songs of the early 2000s, and fifteen years later the recently reanimated west coast band are probably expecting to not be able to play any of their upcoming shows without crowds of fortysomething hipsters shouting "The Crystal Lake" throughout their live sets. so they've written "Ever More" as a sort of riposte to an element within their fanbase, just to prove that their best known song wasn't some sort of fluke. Which everyone knows it wasn't.

JG


Steady Sun - "Benthos"

Usually, describing a track as 'mellow' suggests it's a bit dull or in some way lacklustre. Steady Sun's music is mellow with a capital M however, summery and mood enhancing vibes with a deceptively laid back touch.

JG


 

Cymbals Eat Guitars - "Finally"

I don't remember the first time I heard the name Cymbals Eat Guitars, 2011 or thereabouts, one of those bands who were nearly just a vaguely recalled name until "Finally" arrived in my reviews emails, and fans of countrified psyche-pop will already know what CEG are about. Released to support a New York based legal charity, "Finally" is a lively folk tune reminding us of what and who Cymbals Eat Guitars are.

JG


Idles - "Stendhal Syndrome"

A prescient and informed critique of the works of Francis Bacon, Mark Rothko, and I had to look up exactly what the Stendhal part of the song title refers to. No, not the late 19th century post impressionist Maurice Sendhal, but a real medical condition which causes people to faint suddenly, and which is what you fear may happen to the Idles vocalist if he keeps hopping around art galleries like that. Quite funny really, a bit like that "doing an impression of a post" joke that is still sometimes heard in the refectory bars of our art schools today.

JG

 


Ruth Koleva - "Tokyo"

A very big star in her native Bulgaria, Ruth Koleva takes us to Japan and shows us that video effect where everything is in black and white except the person whose song the video is about, and the song itself is a bit of a groover, including the not entirely essential autotuned vocal at around the halfway mark.

JG

 


Elder Light - "Motor Car"

"We are an emo band" says the info on Elder Light's Bandcamp page and it's a while since I actually heard anyone describe their own music using that description. The blend of grunge and slowcore works spectacularly as Elder Light draw every last drop of sustain from their guitars, like that other band I liked that did something similar and whose name I've now forgotten (that would be Giant Sand).
https://elderlight.bandcamp.com/releases

JG

 

Myles Manley - "Pasta Solo"

I genuinely do not understand this one, but it's released on limited edition vinyl and I usually like to add my support to musicians who do that. Completely unintelligible and rhythmically chaotic in a way which not too many people really get away with nowadays.
https://mylesmanley.bandcamp.com/track/pasta-solo-feat-nobody

JG


Salt Cathedral - "Fragments"

It took more than one listen to really get it about what was at first a not very exciting electropop track, although other reviewers at larger publications (Vice, Metro, The Times) really seem to like "Fragments" a lot so I had another two or three listens just in case I was missing something and, it's all about that synth run just after the second chorus, which is a bit awesome.
https://soundcloud.com/saltcathedral/fragments

JG


Jackson Emmer - "Cry Me A River"

No, not the "Cry Me A River" that you already know at least some of the words to, but a completely different song from one of Denver's noteworthy alt.country practitioners, one of whose albums I reviewed a while back and who is now releasing some new tracks, starting with this easy on the ear ode to nothing much in particular.
https://soundcloud.com/jacksonemmer/cry-me-a-river-from-golden-burro-ep

JG